Observation des lamantins

Remember: You can look, but please don't touch, chase, feed, or give manatees water.

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Encountering manatees in their natural habitat can be an awesome experience! But, for their own protection, wild animals need to stay wild to survive. There are some things to consider and rules to follow to make this an enjoyable experience for both you AND the manatee!

To See Manatees In The Wild

Kayakers demonstrate the best way to view manatees in the wild: from a distance. Please don’t touch manatees or give them food or water.
Kayakers demonstrate the best way to view manatees in the wild: from a distance. Please don’t touch manatees or give them food or water.

During the summer, it can be hard to predict where manatees might show up; manatees typically take advantage of the warm weather, with some traveling as far north as the Chesapeake Bay and others traveling as far west as Texas. In the winter when the weather is cooler, generally November through March, you might be able to see manatees clustered around warm-water sources. Manatees need warm water to survive. In spite of their size, they have relatively little body fat, and their metabolic rate is low compared to other marine mammals. Water temperatures that fall below 70° F (21° C) cause manatees to move into warm water refuge areas.

To See Manatees Living In Human Care

From April through October, your best chance of seeing a manatee is at rehabilitation facilities. After a manatee is rescued, they are sent to these facilities so that veterinary staff can evaluate their condition and give them the care they need before the are released to the wild.